Monetize This: Piss, YouTube, Royalty-Free Content and Copyright

I have been plagued with copyright problems since I first got on the internet in the mid-90s. If it isn’t some little imbecile copying my original hand-created site design and content word for word and slapping their name on it, then it’s some Digital Internet Content Korporation that claims copyright on my video because I used a royalty-free sound-clip I am legally licensed to use in an original video I created and uploaded to YouTube.

These are two sides of the same ugly coin that is pissing on the internet. When an animal pisses, it’s not just to eliminate excess toxins from their bodies, it’s also to mark their territory, claiming the peed-on as theirs. When the little imbecile lifts my graphics and design and puts his name on it, he is claiming my work as his territory. When D.I.C.K. casts its wide net via YouTube’s “Content ID matching system”, D.I.C.K. is claiming even wider territory. And it wouldn’t surprise me any if the little plagiarist teens who stole my graphics and web content back in the 90s, grew up to be employees of some D.I.C.K.

I created a 15 minute video of the vacation Stan and I took the other week and produced it with iMovie. Along with some music I created myself with music/sound apps on my iPad, I also used Royalty-Free sound-clips that Apple provides for its end-users for use in their iLife suite of products. One can include these clips in their own video projects, but not distribute them on a stand-alone basis. Obviously, including one of Apple’s provided Ocean Surf sounds as I did in the video is using the clip within the context of the license, and not distributing it on a stand-alone basis.

Very shortly after I uploaded the video, I got a letter from YouTube:

Dear annandstan,

Your video “A Week Up North: June 22–28, 2012: Northern Wisconsin and The Upper Peninsula, Michigan”, may have content that is owned or licensed by BFM Digital, but it’s still available on YouTube! In some cases, ads may appear next to it.

This claim is not penalizing your account status. Visit your Copyright Notice page for more details on the policy applied to your video.

Sincerely,
– The YouTube Team

I didn’t know what to think. I didn’t use anything Stan or I didn’t either create ourselves or use with a license, as with the sound clips from iMovie. I clicked on the link YouTube provided to me, and read this:

Your video may include the following copyrighted content:

“Nature Sounds-Pounding Waves at Big Sur, California for Well Being and Relaxat”, sound recording administered by:
BFM Digital

(What is “Relaxat?”)

I immediately disputed the claim, claiming I had the legal right to use the sound clips I used. Not being one to sit idly by and wait for a response, I started doing research on the web about BFM (an unfortunate acronym if I ever heard one), YouTube, Copyright and iMovie. I found message boards where other people were claiming similar situations: using a soundclip from iLife in a movie they created with iMovie, and BFM claims copyright on their movie. I was not alone.

To BFM’s credit, they did seem to have a representative that would participate in these forum discussions, and they did actually release their copyright claims. So I found BFM’s site, an email address, and wrote them an email explaining my situation. Within a few hours, they released their claim on my video. I don’t know if it was just that they were quick to respond to my YouTube dispute, or if my email expedited the process. I was relieved.

But not for long. Less than two days later, I get the same form-email from YouTube, this time concerning a different D.I.C.K.:

Dear annandstan,

Your video “A Week Up North: June 22–28, 2012: Northern Wisconsin and The Upper Peninsula, Michigan”, may have content that is owned or licensed by IODA, but it’s still available on YouTube! In some cases, ads may appear next to it.

This claim is not penalizing your account status. Visit your Copyright Notice page for more details on the policy applied to your video.

Sincerely,
– The YouTube Team

What The…?

This is just too weird. Again, I visited the link in the email and found this:

Your video may include the following copyrighted content:

“Deep Sleep Aid-Ocean Beach Sounds”, sound recording administered by:
IODA

You have got to be kidding me! Being that the iLife sound clips I used in the movie were various ambient chord treatments, a Theramin, Crickets and Ocean Surf, it was obvious IODA was claiming copyright on the same audio clip as BFM! How is this even possible? How can two different companies claim copyright on the same sound!?!? Therein lies one of the many problems with YouTube’s Content ID Matching System. It’s simply inaccurate.

I then did some research on IODA and am suspecting they are not as forgiving as BFM because they’re owned by Sony, hence, a bigger D.I.C.K.. I submitted a dispute to their copyright claim as well as an email via a contact form on their site, and as of this writing am still awaiting their response.

The fact that I am having to do this TWICE for the same video, the fact that YouTube is sending out these form emails constantly to users who are legally using royalty-free content in their videos is an enormous waste of time. It is harassment, pure and simple. And why do they do it? If you read between the lines in the form email, it’s not saying that the user has violated copyright and that they should remove the video. No, they don’t want you to remove the video. They want you to keep the video up so they can monetize it! D.I.C.K. wants to have an ad placed on your video that they claim uses their content, so they can earn revenue from the ad. They harass you relentlessly in hopes that you give up in disputing the claims so that the video remains with an ad.

It makes one think that one could pilfer and plagiarize all the copyrighted material possible, stick it in videos on YouTube, and all the D.I.C.K.s would LOVE it because it would simply mean more ad revenue for them! That’s why the little web twerp from ’90s who infringes on my copyright is NO DIFFERENT than the D.I.C.K. who claims I’m infringing on theirs! All that matters for them is good looking or good sounding content, whether they actually have legal claim to it or not, because that feeds their ego or Korporation. They need those two sides of the same coin. They need monetized videos. They need bigger D.I.C.K.s.

Corporations aren’t people, you morons.

good read: YouTube Copyfraud & Abuse of the Content ID System

About Ann

Painter, jewelry-maker, graphic designer, dingbat font creator, imagineer, progressive, liberal, Wisconsinite by birth and later by choice, dog and cat mom, sushi-lover and foodie.

6 thoughts on “Monetize This: Piss, YouTube, Royalty-Free Content and Copyright

  1. They are going to claim what ever they have to claim to get the use of videos for add money. These people are not interested in the truth, but just sticking it to anyone they can to get money. I’m starting to hate YouTube. That was a great article: YouTube Copyfraud & Abuse of the Content ID System.

  2. I’m starting to hate YouTube too, as well as the corporation that owns it, Google. It’s like when Google started out in 1998, they were the cool little guy, lightweight and hip to counter the Yahoos of the world.

    I’ll use YT for my app videos still, but when I use extensive production like this with ROYALTY FREE MUSIC CLIPS, I’m going to Vimeo.

  3. Fortunately on Monday IODA released their “copyright claim” on my video.

    I suspect, but am not sure, that contacting these companies directly expedites the process, as I’ve heard of months going by without response with some people.

    Also, because I rightfully specified that I had a license to use the sound via iMovie/iLife, there is nothing they can lawfully do at that point. I mean, what are they going to do, dispute that I have a license? Ask to see my receipt for the purchase of iMovie or a Mac? Papers, please?

    However, if I claimed “fair use” or something else, they could probably claim I don’t have the right. Just speculating.

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